JAXA Repository / AIREX 未来へ続く、宙(そら)への英知
46785000.pdf2.48 MB
titleEffects of zonal and meridional neutral winds on the electron density and temperature at the height of 600 km
Other Title高度600kmの電子密度および温度に対する帯状および子午線沿い中性風の影響
Author(jpn)小山 孝一郎; 渡部 重十
Author(eng)Oyama, Koichiro; Watanabe, Shigeto
Author Affiliation(jpn)宇宙航空研究開発機構 宇宙科学研究本部; 北海道大学 大学院理学研究科
Author Affiliation(eng)Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Institute of Space and Astronautical Science; Hokkaido University Graduate School of Science
Issue Date2004-03
PublisherJapan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
宇宙航空研究開発機構
Publication date2004-03
Languageeng
AbstractElectron temperature (Te) and density (Ne) data which were obtained with equator-orbiting satellite Hinotori in 1981-1982 at the height of 600 km are used to study the local time, latitude, longitude, and seasonal variations of the topside ionosphere at low latitudes. The study shows that difference of behavior of the daytime Te and Ne between two hemispheres is well understood by the effect of neutral wind. Electron density in the summer hemisphere is higher than that in winter hemisphere due to meridional wind component (seasonal variation) which blows from summer hemisphere to winter hemisphere and consequently electron temperature is lower in summer hemisphere than in winter hemisphere. In addition to this effect, effect of the zonal wind component (diurnal change) is superposed at the regions where magnetic meridian plane tilts. Especially in the American sector, where magnetic meridian plane tilts about 20 degrees westward, zonal wind effect is comparable to the meridional wind effect.
DescriptionJAXA Research and Development Report
宇宙航空研究開発機構研究開発報告
KeywordsIRI; electron temperature; electron density; Hinotori satellite; annual variation; high altitude; ionosphere; neutral wind; IRI; 電子温度; 電子密度; ひのとり衛星; 季節変化; 高高度; 電離層; 中性風
Document TypeTechnical Report
JAXA Category研究開発報告
ISSN1349-1113
SHI-NOAA0046785000
Report NoJAXA-RR-03-002E
URIhttps://repository.exst.jaxa.jp/dspace/handle/a-is/50652


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